R U 4 Congo?

Posted by Eileen White Read on Jul 22, 2009 | Original article

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Enough’s RAISE Hope for Congo campaign reached out to video artists to help tell the story about the crises plaguing the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s – an epidemic of sexual violence, armed groups earning millions from the mining of conflict minerals, increasing numbers of people displaced by conflict. 

We launched the Come Clean 4 Congo partnership with YouTube, and dozens of activists responded with clever, creative videos illustrating the scourge of conflict minerals. A trio of celebrity judges narrowed them down to three finalists. Now it’s up to the public to choose the very best – beginning today. You can visit www.youtube.com/enoughproject to watch the three finalist videos (they’re only a minute long each) and cast your vote. The winner will be announced on September 9. 

Or just watch the videos here:

 

 

 

The videographer who made the winner will be flown to Los Angeles, where the video will be screened at the first-ever human rights symposium connected to the Hollywood Film Festival at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood on October 24. The winner will be presented with an award at the symposium, which will feature an expert panel of speakers to address the issue of violence against women in Congo, Afghanistan, Iran and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

The winning video also will be featured on the Enough Project’s websites and YouTube page. Judges for the contest were Oscar-nominated actor Ryan Gosling, actress Sonya Walger from ABC’s "Lost," and Oscar-nominated director Wim Wenders.
 
But don’t stop there: Please help us end the mining of conflict minerals by endorsing the Conflict Minerals Pledge. All you have to do is text CONGOPLEDGE (one word, no spaces) to ACTION (228466) and endorse the pledge. Help Enough reach our goal of 100,000 endorsements.

Go to our contest page to VOTE 

Enough Project
1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005
Phone: (202) 682-1611 • Fax: (202) 682-6140

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