Feed items

Conflict Minerals Company Rankings

2012 Conflict Minerals Company Rankings

For a second time, The Enough Project has ranked the largest electronics companies on their efforts toward using and investing in conflict-free minerals in their products. Our consumer action guide will help you understand what actions companies are (or are not) taking to contribute to the creation of a clean minerals trade in Congo, and ultimately, the reduction of conflict there.

Update on Congo violence: Envoys call for restraint, timely electoral process

Editor's Note: The Enough Project is deeply concerned about the violence occurring in Kinshasa, Goma, and other cities in Congo. Today, the Team of International Envoys for the Great Lakes region (comprised of UN Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Said Djinnit, UN Special Representative and Head of MONUSCO Martin Kobler, AU Special Representative for the Great Lakes Boubacar Diarra, EU Senior Coordinator for the Great Lakes Koen Vervaeke, US Special Envoy for the Great Lakes and the DRC Russell D.

Ending Grand Theft on a Global Scale: Prosecuting the War Crime of Pillage

In Enough Project Policy Analyst Holly Dranginis’ latest report, Grand Theft Global: Prosecuting the War Crime of Natural Resource Pillage in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Dranginis provides an inside look at why the widespread theft of minerals in Congo has gone on unpunished, and how policymakers and legal practitioners can help advance cases.  Grand Theft Global is the result of research in Congo, The Hague, and Washington, DC, including dozens of interviews with Congolese

LRA commander Ongwen should be transferred to ICC, support to justice & reconciliation in LRA-affected areas should be increased

Editor's Note: This post was co-authored by Holly Dranginis and Sasha Lezhnev.

Senior Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander Dominic Ongwen, who surrendered Tuesday in the Central African Republic, should be transferred to the International Criminal Court to face charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes. 

Attacks in Beni, eastern Congo. Part 2: Violence continues, authorities launch gradual response

Editor's Note: In the first post  in a series about a number of deadly civilian attacks in Beni territory in North Kivu, we described the initial surge of violence in October, and tensions between local populations and the authorities meant to protect them – local government and MONUSCO peacekeepers.

Attacks in Beni, eastern Congo. Part 2: Violence continues, authorities launch gradual response

Editor's Note: In the first post  in a series about a number of deadly civilian attacks in Beni territory in North Kivu, we described the initial surge of violence in October, and tensions between local populations and the authorities meant to protect them – local government and MONUSCO peacekeepers.

Attacks in Beni, eastern Congo. Part 1: A surge in violence fuels civilian discontent

Editor's Note: This is the first post in a series on a surge of violence against civilians in Beni territory and increasing tensions between the local populations and the authorities meant to protect them.This post was written by Enough Project intern Jasper Kubasek.

Attacks in Beni, eastern Congo. Part 1: A surge in violence fuels civilian discontent

Editor's Note: This is the first post in a series on a surge of violence against civilians in Beni territory and increasing tensions between the local populations and the authorities meant to protect them.This post was written by Enough Project intern Jasper Kubasek.

Daily Beast Op-ed: Aaron Rodgers Targets Congo War, Conflict Minerals

In an op-ed featured on The Daily Beast, John Prendergast is raising the challenge to stop the flow of conflict minerals – and making the case that doing so is fundamental to stopping the decades-long conflict in Eastern Congo. Joining voices with activists from Super Bowl winner Aaron Rodgers of the Green Bay Packers to Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Dr.

Enough Project
1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005
Phone: (202) 682-1611 • Fax: (202) 682-6140

© 2015 Center for American Progress. All Rights Reserved